Wednesday, May 31, 2017

A Good Shop, Part 4


Today was my birthday and I was allowed some freedom to do what I wanted with my time.  I started off with a stop at Denver Balancing to drop off the Nautilus' engine internals...for balancing.  Again.  This version of the engine will use a 15lb lightened flywheel.  The new Sachs pressure plate will be balanced to this slightly lightened flywheel, along with everything else that rotates or is otherwise flung around by the crank.  Other new key components are a set of Kolbenschmidt 85.5 pistons.  This version of the engine will also use a 74mm crank for a net displacement of 1700cc's.  It will also use dual port heads.  That's right--this will be a mild performance engine and there's no reason to choke it with single port heads.  I'll have the engine internals back next Tuesday evening and the new heads will arrive on Wednesday.  I'll re-start the engine build the following weekend, just in time for the car to be delivered back from the body shop.  My timing is never very good and once again the garage will be short on space with all the projects in simultaneous flight.

Engine configuration aside, I've definitely forsaken the path of originality with some other recent modifications to the craft.  The sunroof addition is definitely going against the standards for an M343 model designation as represented on the craft's VIN tag.  The sunroof still looks the part and I think it will be a wonderful feature.  To verify the sliding steel panel's fit and finish, I drove over to the body shop today and spent a couple of hours installing it.  I got it pretty close to perfection during the test fit and can probably do even better during the final fitting.



Fitting the sliding steel roof section was a fairly straightforward affair.  No nicks, dents, scrapes or scratches.  I had previously cleaned all parts and put things together dry.  During the final assembly, I'll use white lithium grease or Vaseline for the cables--or maybe a Teflon dry lubricant from Dupont.  More research is needed, but these are used most commonly.  The other thing that will be done is the installation of perimeter seals around the outer edge of the sliding steel panel.  The stuff I have is grey and is pretty good, but it's too short and I need more of it.  I think I got it from Wolfburg West, but whatever I use will have to be glued into place, two-thirds around the front and side sunroof opening, and the remaining third around that back edge of the sliding steel panel itself.
 
The picture to the left is of the cable drive gear housing mounted to the underside center rear of the roof.  Attached to the drive gear is the emergency crank handle which I used during the sliding steel roof section installation.  I wanted to make sure the cables weren't binding and the outer roof section didn't get scratched, so running it all manually by hand seemed to make the most sense.  There is no electric roof motor or drive shaft installed.  It all worked well.
 
Also note in the picture that the bottom of the roof was painted L514 Emerald Green.  The same is true of the sliding steel roof section.  Originally, none of this would have been very well painted and might even show signs of surface rust.  I wanted metal protection and a dark surface for the perforations in
the headliner to contrast with, so I chose the body color as the finish.  Much of the underside of the roof will be covered with a modern sound deadener, so in the end it won't really matter that much. 
 
One interesting piece of Karmann factory originality was that the roof color was written in very large letters on the underside of the sliding steel roof section, usually in a contrasting grease pencil, much
as the body color was originally written in the left headlamp bowl on both the Type 14 and Type 34 cars.  I might do this in yellow or white grease pencil for both the roof and body before final assembly.

Another interesting point of authenticity is the roof number '519' stamped into the cable drive mounting area on the main roof, as well as into the rubber bumper bracket on the tail of the sliding roof section.  These numbers would have originally matched, as they do on my car.  This is due to the fact that the roof opening shape matches the sliding roof section, as well as the curvature of the roof itself.

I left the sliding steel roof section installed into the car so the final paint cut and buff could be done with the sliding steel roof section in place.  Unfortunately, I also found some problems that need to be resolved.  I managed to fill one side of an 8.5' X 11" sheet of paper with my notes and received no arguments from the shop manager when I presented the for review.  All of it is fixable and should all be sorted by June 10th.  I made some progress today!

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